Anthony Martinez, a Conesvile native, now serves as a Petty Officer 2nd Class in the Navy's Fleet Weather Center.

By Jesse Hawthorne, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class, Navy Office of Community Outreach

Most Americans rely on weather forecasts to plan their daily routine. The U.S. Navy is no different. With numerous ships, submarines, and airplanes deployed in the U.S. Atlantic Fleet’s area of operations, sailors stationed at the Fleet Weather Center in Norfolk, Virginia, make it their primary mission to monitor extreme weather conditions in support of the fleet’s daily operations.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Anthony Martinez, a 2009 Columbus Community High School graduate and native of Conesvile, Iowa, is one of these sailors serving at the Fleet Weather Center, which is responsible for providing timely, comprehensive, and tactically relevant information for ships, submarines, aircraft, and other commands operating out of the Hampton Roads area. As a Navy information systems technician, Martinez is responsible for maintaining the network in support of the operations watch floor.


Martinez credits success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned growing up in Conesvile. “I learned about having a good work ethic from growing up in a small town,” said Martinez.


Martinez is playing an important part in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances, and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy. “Our priorities center on people, capabilities, and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results, and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer.


Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, Martinez is most proud of earning a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal in 2017 from Coastal Riverine Group Two for a successful tour. “I am proud of this because it shows the hard work that I put into the job that I had to perform,” said Martinez.


Serving in the Navy is a continuing tradition of military service for Martinez, who has military ties with family members who have previously served. Martinez is honored to carry on that family tradition. “I have had numerous family members that have served in various branches of the military,” said Martinez.
As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s mo

st relied upon assets, Martinez and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes, providing what the Navy and the nation needs. “Serving gives me a sense of pride and accomplishment,” added Martinez.