Cooking with the Doctor

In my last article on April 1st, I discussed a community cookbook. Here are some thoughts about submissions.

One submission per household. Pick your favorite recipe. There is no limit to the length of the recipe. I am sure you (my readers) have a particular recipe that family and friends rave about. Ideally, I would publish the recipe where others (particularly children) can help. I can see cookies, cakes, perhaps a meatloaf or two. Healthy approaches, including meatless, would be appropriate submissions.

I am not sure on the response. I anticipate (hope for) a healthy response since the beneficiaries from the proceeds are two most important causes in our community.

Submissions should be made to me at [email protected]. What I envision is that a typical submitter (gosh, is that a real word?) would take a picture of their recipe, attach it to an email, and then send it off to me here at the newspaper. If you (as a submitter) are technically challenged, get some help from someone in the family who is more technologically attuned to submit the picture. Kids have no fear when it comes to such technology actions.

Due to my social isolation, I will be limited in making significant progress on completion. What I will be able to do is begin the task of arranging the submissions. I am uncertain whether I would publish according to alphabetical name of the submitter (there’s that word again), or according to some other food classification such as main meals, desserts, appetizers, and the like.

What is my “dream” about this cookbook? Well, I envision 100 responses. I would like to believe that Muscatine has an immense amount of cooking talent.

 I can see a diverse array of submissions, including ethnic foods. My father was excellent at making a Polish dish called Pierogis. I can see submissions from younger cookie makers to mature folks who prepare an excellent turkey. I can see a vast array of specialized food items from a number of different countries. Both men and women would be making submissions. There may even be a few “unusual” combinations that would challenge a family’s taste buds. Plenty of soups. My Polish grandmother made an excellent Potato Soup. She raised six boys during the depression while my grandfather farmed. Many recipes would not be expensive for those who are on a tight budget. Portions would last and feed the friends and family who break bread together.

Who knows–perhaps even neighbors would get together to try several recipes from the cookbook. My vision would include the potential for families to try different recipes together, perhaps a backyard get together after the social isolation has been lifted.